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Monsters Revealed 

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Live-streamed on Tuesday, March 3, 2015

Nerds Discuss Unusual Animal Behaviour, Mythical Creatures & Science Fiction

Are you ready for the Sea Monsters Revealed exhibition at the Vancouver Aquarium? 

Join us for a unique evening about monsters.  We’re partnering with Nerd Nite Vancouver and bringing you three nerdy presentations on “monsters”. 

Nerd Nite is an international event that provides a laid-back environment with lots to learn and lots to drink!  Nerd Nite Vancouver is celebrating its one year anniversary at the Vancouver Aquarium. 

Chips and beer will be available for purchase during the event.

Topics

#1: Brood parasites: Monsters of the bird world

Have you ever heard of brood parasitic indigobirds and how they go about laying their eggs in the nests of other birds?  The founder of Nerd Nite Dr. Chris Balakrishnan will explore how and why this behaviour has evolved, and will make a case for why some birds may not be as innocent as they seem.

#2: Meet Cadborosaurus: An introduction to marine cryptozoology

Have you seen any “sea monsters” in the coastal waters of the northeast Pacific?  You may have seen the Cadborosaurus, or "Caddy" for short.  Dr. Paul LeBlond is an Emeritus Professor in Earth, Ocean and Atmospheric Sciences at UBC and has an interest in sea-monsters. 

#3 Could Godzilla play hockey? The rocket science of movie monsters

Could Godzilla really exist?  Dr. Jaymie Matthews is going to talk about the monsters of science fiction and why, or why they are not, plausible based on the characteristics of their worlds.

Speakers

Dr. Chris Balakrishnan is a professor in the Department of Biology at East Carolina University (in North Carolina). Chris founded the originalNerd Nite in Boston as a graduate student, having spent too much time at the pub. Despite his status as “Nerd Nite founder”, he cautions the audience not to set expectations too high.

Dr. Paul LeBlond is an Emeritus Professor in Earth, Ocean and Atmospheric Sciences at UBC. In parallel to his research andteaching activities in physical oceanography, he developed an early interest in "sea-monsters", leading to in-depth studies of Cadborosaurus and the creation of the BC Scientific Cryptozoology Club. He now lives on Galiano Island where he is active in community organizations.

Dr. Jaymie Matthews is an astrophysical “gossip columnist” who unveils the hidden lifestyles of stars by eavesdropping on “the music of the spheres.”  His version of an interstellar iPod is Canada’s first space telescope, MOST (Microvariability and Oscillations of STars), which detects vibrations in the light of humming stars. MOST also makes Matthews an “astro-paparazzo” by helping him spy on planets around other stars that might be homes for alien celebrities. Probably not Vulcans, but microbes. The discovery of microbes on another world would qualify them as newsmakers of the century.

A Professor of Astrophysics at UBC and a member of the Board of the HR MacMillan Space Centre, Prof. Matthews is also an Officer of the Order of Canada. In addition to research, education and outreach are also important facets of Dr. Matthews' life. He's a co-founder and regular instructor of UBC’s Science 101 course for residents of Vancouver’s Downtown East Side, and a mentor in the national Loran Scholar programme.  Dr. Matthews was a “Human Library Book” in a programme where “readers” could reserve him for 20 minutes at a time to ask anythingabout astronomy. He was also a storyteller at the Kootenay Storytelling Festival in 2013.

 

Vancouver Aquarium public programs provide family-friendly opportunities for people to connect with each other through hands-on activities, lectures, films, classes and field trips—all focused on aquatic conservation. 

Nerd Nite
 
 
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