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Japanese Tsunami

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Symposium On Floating Articles And Debris Resulting From The Great East Japanese Earthquake

Join the Vancouver Aquarium and the Japan Environmental Action Network for the North American Symposium on Tsunami Debris.  Non-governmental organizations, concerned citizens and government groups that are working together to clean up marine debris—including Tsunami debris—along the west coast of North America are giving updates on tsunami debris efforts in Canada and the US. 

On March 11, 2011, a magnitude 8.9 earthquake—the most powerful earthquake to ever hit the country—struck Japan’s north-eastern coast and generated a tsunami that washed colossal amounts of garbage and debris into our oceans.  Soon after the tsunami, debris began landing along the west coast of North America and officials have now estimated that as much as 1.5 million tons of debris could wash up on BC shores.

This event is sponsored by the Ministry of Environment in Japan, implemented by the Japan Environmental Action Network (JEAN).  Refreshments provided.

Symposium Agenda

  • 5:30 p.m. Doors Open to the Public
  • 6:00 p.m. Opening Remarks
  • 6:15 p.m. Japan Updates
  • 7:15 p.m. Break for Refreshments
  • 7:40 p.m. Canada Updates
  • 7:55 p.m. United States Updates
  • 8:40 p.m. Summary
  • 8:50 p.m. Closing Remarks

Take Action

Join the Tsunami Debris Registry or Great Canadian Shoreline Cleanup

Date

Wednesday, October 1, 2014

Location

Vancouver Aquarium

Time

6 p.m.
Doors open at 5:30 p.m. 

PRICE

$10 (non-members)
$8 (members) 

tickets

Register Now

Watch Online

This symposium will be streamed live on the Vancouver Aquarium’s YouTube channel. 

Watch Now

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